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Usenet Messages from the thread "Is Mind Control Rampant In Wisconsin?"   Messages 1 - 3 of 3.

Message 1 in thread
From: Abemarf (abemarf@aol.com)
Subject: Is Mind Control Rampant In Wisconsin?
Newsgroups: alt.mindcontrol
Date: 2001-03-08 11:00:07 PST

There are two possibilities:

1.)Either Wisconsin has an abundance of "paranoid schizophrenics"

2.)Many people in Wisconsin are being targeted by mind control technology
which is being used to force them to commit crimes against their will.

After reading these newspaper articles, decide for yourself ....

======


MAN FOUND INSANE IN GASOLINE ATTACK 
CAPITAL TIMES [Madison,Wisconsin]
MONDAY March 9, 1992 
Page number  4A  

MILWAUKEE (AP) - A man convicted of attempting to kill a college student by
dousing her with gasoline and trying to set her on fire has been found innocent
by reason of mental disease or defect. 

A Circuit Court jury deliberated 14 hours over the weekend before reaching the
verdict Sunday in the sanity phase of the trial of Reginald Humphrey, 39, of
Milwaukee. The jury decided last week that he was guilty of attempted
first-degree intentional homicide and recklessly endangering safety.
Authorities said he attacked the 27-year-old woman as she stood in line for a
bus ticket at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Aug. 15. Humphrey was
described in court records as a paranoid schizophrenic who severely abused a
variety of drugs and heard voices for years telling him what to do. 

Defense attorney Patrick Brennan said his client would appear today before
Judge Arlene D. Connors so that a date could be set for the judge to sign a
mental commitment order. 

-----------


MENTAL COMMITMENT ORDERED IN SLAYING:
JUDGE RULES THAT GETTRIDGE WAS SO DELUSIONAL 
WHEN HE KILLED A MADISON MAN THAT HE CAN'T BE HELD RESPONSIBLE

Wisconsin State Journal [Madison]
Saturday, October 30, 1999 
by Lesley Rogers- Courts reporter 

Page number  1B  

Renaldo Gettridge -- described as a ``chronic paranoid schizophrenic'' -- was
so mentally delusional when he killed a Madison man last year that he can't be
held criminally responsible, a Dane County judge ruled Friday. Gettridge, 31,
was found not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect in the shooting
death of Mack Dixon, 18, on Aug. 6, 1998 in a parking lot off Granada Way. 

Gettridge had been charged with first-degree intentional homicide. On Friday,
as part of a plea agreement between prosecutor Doug McLean and defense attorney
Dan Dunn, Gettridge entered a no-contest plea to the lesser charge of
second-degree intentional homicide. Circuit Judge Robert DeChambeau on Friday
committed Gettridge to a maximum of 30 years in a mental health institution,
most likely Mendota Mental Health Institute. DeChambeau also ordered that
Gettridge be kept medicated for continued treatment of his mental illness. 

Gettridge shot Dixon three times at close range and then two more times as
Dixon tried to run away. Because of his mental illness, Gettridge apparently
thought his ex-wife and former girlfriend had hired someone to kill him and
thought his life was in danger when he saw Dixon last August, DeChambeau said. 

Legal proceedings were put on hold in October 1998 when Gettridge was found
incompetent -- that is, unable to understand the charge against him or help
with his defense. Gettridge was treated at Mendota and in May was found to be
competent. When asked by DeChambeau Friday if he knew the charge against him,
Gettridge replied that he ``shot and killed someone, Mack Dixon.'' Dixon's
mother, Billy Jean Cox Christian, stood up in court and made an emotional plea.


``I want to ask why did he keep shooting him? Why did he steal his life and his
dreams and hopes from him?'' Christian said through tears. ``Why did he take a
person that didn't do no harm to him?'' 

DeChambeau said he understood the difficulty the Dixon family must have in
accepting Gettridge's insanity plea. ``None of us here can give you good
reason, especially, and I don't mean to speak for Mr. Gettridge ... but least
of all can he tell you (why Dixon was killed,'' DeChambeau said. 


----------

KILLER GETS OK TO LEAVE: 
MENDOTA DOCTORS SAY HE'S NO DANGER 

Capital Times [Madison,WI]
Tuesday, August 31, 1999 
by Mike Miller, The Capital Times 
Page number  6A  

Final approval was given today for the release of Dennis Wilder from the
Mendota Mental Health Institute, where he has been treated for the past 15
years after killing his roommate. There was virtually no disagreement that
Wilder, 46, should be released into the community under a tightly structured
plan in which he will live in a supervised setting and engage in continued
therapy. 


Dane County Circuit Judge Angela Bartell approved the plan on the joint
recommendation of Assistant District Attorney Robert Kaiser and Assistant State
Public Defender Robert Burke. 
Three psychiatrists who examined Wilder for the court all recommended he be
released into the community with various safeguards in place. Among them was
Dr. E. Rick Beebe of Mendota, who said the ``probability of dangerousness to
himself or others on a conditional release . . . is substantially unlikely.'' 

Beebe said Wilder has made great strides in treatment since being admitted to
Mendota after being found not guilty by reason of mental disease in 1986 for
the killing of Raymond Denny. ``All of his overtly psychotic behavior and
delusional beliefs abated after (1993),'' Beebe wrote to the court, ``and he
has not had problems with psychosis since.'' 

Wilder has a history of mental illness dating to the 1970s, according to court
records, and had been in treatment programs in his native Grant County as well
as at both Madison General Hospital (now Meriter) and the Mendota Mental Health
Institute. 

In late 1984 he and Denny, both of whom were receiving outpatient treatment for
mental illness through the Program for Assertive Community Treatment, shared an
apartment on Ann Street in Madison. On Aug. 26, 1985, Denny was sitting in a
kitchen chair of the apartment when Wilder went to his bedroom, got a gun and
shot him in the back six times. 

Wilder told police and doctors that he heard voices from a computer and those
voices controlled his life and told him what to do. ``The computer was making
me think that I should waste away Ray because of the conditions in the world,
the Star Wars and everything,'' he said at the time. 

``The computer has done a lot of terrible things to me, but killing Ray was the
worst one,'' he told a doctor following the killing. He was diagnosed as a
paranoid schizophrenic, and four psychiatrists who examined him at the time
said his mental illness made him unable to conform his acts to the law or
understand the wrongfulness of his actions. Four days before the killing,
Wilder bought the gun he used at the now-defunct Salad Bar in downtown Madison.


Denny was the second member of his family to be murdered in 1985. In January of
that year, his sister, Cindy Sue Denny, was killed by her boyfriend, Scott
Dolan, in an apartment in Stoughton. Dolan is serving a life term in prison. 


----------


IN DEAL, AMARA IS RULED TO BE INSANE 
Capital Times [Madison,WI]
Monday, July 19, 1999 
by Mike Miller, The Capital Times 
Page number  1A  

Salim Amara, who committed one of the most horrific crimes in the history of
the city when he dumped gasoline on bus passengers and set them on fire, was
found insane today. Amara had been scheduled to go on trial today on two counts
of attempted murder, three counts of first-degree reckless injury, one count of
criminal damage to property and one count of robbery in the bus burning on
April 19, 1998. 

But the prosecution team of District Attorney Diane Nicks and Assistant
District Attorney Robert Kaiser, and the defense team of public defenders Jon
Helland and Benjamin Gonring, reached an agreement in the case in which Amara
entered ``no contest'' pleas to the charges against him and the prosecution
conceded he was insane at the time of the bus fire. The robbery charge was
dismissed on the request of prosecutors, who said there was no evidence to
convict Amara of stealing the wallet of one of the victims. 

With three of the bus fire victims looking on, Dane County Circuit Judge
Maryann Sumi closely questioned Amara on his understanding of his rights before
accepting his pleas, accepting the agreement that he was insane, then finding
Amara not guilty by reason of mental disease. Sumi immediately committed Amara
to the Mendota Mental Health Institute but will hold an additional hearing
later to determine the parameters of that commitment. Nicks said both during
and after the hearing that prosecutors had little choice but to stipulate that
Amara was insane because it was the unanimous opinion of all the doctors who
have examined him since the fire. Helland said Amara had been suffering from
mental illness for the past two years and the ``evidence is overwhelming'' that
he was insane under the law. 

Amara, according to court documents, purchased gasoline at a PDQ store on
Milwaukee Street on the far east side on the fateful day, boarded a bus near
there and rode to the far west side of town. 

When the bus was near the intersection of Prairie and Hammersley roads, Amara
rose from his seat and walked toward passengers Eric Nelson and his fiance,
Heather Gallagher. Amara smiled, dumped the gasoline on Nelson, then lit a
match and tossed it on him. 

The sudden burst of explosive flame filled the bus, injuring everybody on
board. ``It seemed that within a split second, the whole bus was on fire -- the
whole bus,'' victim Ernestine Wittig would later say. Nelson, Gallagher,
Wittig, bus driver Gary Isom and passenger Rodney Scribner were all badly
burned. Amara also was burned, but not as badly. Nelson, Gallagher and Wittig
were in court today and watched intently as Amara was brought into the
courtroom and seated at the defense table. It was the first time Nelson and
Gallagher saw, in person, the man who caused them so much pain and suffering.
Wittig had previously identified Amara as the one who set the fire. 

Had the case gone to trial, jurors would have heard how the fire quickly
engulfed the victims and the bus and how neighbors and passersby worked
feverishly to do what they could to help the victims until medical personnel
arrived. The victims were taken to the burn unit at University Hospital where
it was feared that some might not live. Nelson was the most critically injured
with burns over 97 percent of his body and was hospitalized until June 1 of
this year. 

The defense never challenged the facts in the case, essentially conceding early
on that Amara set the bus fire. 

Instead, defense lawyers insisted that Amara was suffering from a mental
disease and was becoming increasingly troubled before the fire. Right and
wrong: Had there been a trial, the focus would have been on Amara's mental
state at the time of the fire. Under state law, a defendant claiming insanity
must show he suffers from a mental disease and, as a result of that disease,
lacks substantial capacity either to appreciate the wrongfulness of his acts or
conform his behavior to the law. Helland said there was no question the defense
could have met that burden. ``There wasn't a jury anywhere that would say
otherwise,'' he said after today's court hearing. 

In the months leading up to today's trial date, four mental health experts,
including Dr. Patricia Jens and Dr. Park Dietz for the prosecution and Dr. Dan
Begel and Dr. Caton Roberts for the defense, examined Amara. All four agreed
that Amara suffers from paranoid schizophrenia and all but Dietz agreed that he
could not conform his actions to the law or appreciate the wrongfulness of his
acts. 

In Amara's case, his mental status was brought into question soon after his
arrest when relatives said he had been becoming increasingly irrational before
the bus burning. 

A couple of minor brushes with the law in 1997 brought Amara to the attention
of authorities, but a competency examination in November 1997 did not reveal
any major mental disease, doctors' reports show. Amara was hospitalized at
University Hospital after the fire and stayed there until May 7, when his burns
had healed enough so he could be released from the hospital and booked into the
Dane County Jail. Within two weeks jailers were reporting that Amara was
experiencing hallucinations, hearing voices, and engaging in screaming fits and
profane and sometimes violent outbursts. 

At that point the county took the unusual step of having Amara committed to the
Mendota Mental Health Institute under a civil commitment procedure. Doctors who
examined him then also concluded he was a paranoid schizophrenic. 

AMARA'S DEMONS SCARED HIS FAMILY 
Capital Times [Madison,WI]
Thursday, August 20, 1998 
by Chuck Nowlen, The Capital Times 

Page number  1A  

The terrible voices kept screaming in his brain, but he couldn't do a thing to
stop them. They scrambled his thoughts and enraged him. He said demons were
trying to get inside his head. 
For brief periods, the voices would be still, and Salim Amara would become only
the withdrawn, Walkman-wearing loner he'd almost always been.

But then, in a flash, they'd take over again, several of Amara's family members
said in recent interviews with The Capital Times. He'd talk crazy and confront
people. He'd rip pages out of the Bible and report seeing ``the devil's car''
on the street. Those were the times Amara, all but homeless since age 14 after
being kicked out by his mother, would scare the daylights out of the few close
friends and relatives he had. 

According to family members and other sources, Amara's episodes began abruptly
in the spring of 1996 when a supervisor found him covered with ``pots of
sweat,'' shuddering and nearly ``catatonic'' at the restaurant where he worked.
It would take two years and an unspeakable tragedy -- the April bus fire Amara
ignited on Madison's far west side -- for him to get any kind of treatment at
all. 


``He would try to explain what he was hearing, what he was thinking, but then
he wouldn't be able to explain it,'' recalled one of several family members who
spoke to The Capital Times on condition of anonymity. ``If you tried to talk to
him, he wouldn't understand what you were saying. Then he'd accuse you --
someone he's known all his life -- of trying to get inside his head, too. And
when he'd talk, he'd have that strange smile on his face.'' 

Judgment: On Friday, the spotlight will be cast again on Amara, who has been
held, heavily medicated, in the forensic unit at Mendota Mental Health
Institute since May after a month at the Dane County Jail. 

Amara's mental competency hearing, which will determine whether he remains at
Mendota for treatment or stands trial on two counts of attempted first-degree
murder, three counts of reckless injury while armed and one count of criminal
damage to property while armed, has been scheduled before Dane County Circuit
Judge Richard Callaway. 

If Amara is found competent to stand trial, his preliminary hearing will
follow. The competency hearing will turn solely on whether Amara, diagnosed by
at least one mental health professional as a paranoid schizophrenic since the
bus fire, is able to understand the charges against him and participate in his
own defense. 

Amara's lawyer, public defender Jon Helland, thinks the answer is clear. ``What
help has he been? Zero,'' says Helland, who at least weekly has gone to Mendota
to visit Amara, whom he described as still agitated, hallucinatory and
disoriented. ``Frankly, I don't think he knows what's going on at all. Right
now, I'm in a position where I'm sort of shooting in the dark.'' 

In the absence of any coherent help from Amara, Helland and the mental health
experts he plans to call at the hearing have relied almost entirely on jail
logs, police and court records and the accounts of Amara's friends and family
to build their case. If Amara is found competent to stand trial, Helland said
he would mount an insanity defense. 

----------


PORN STORE ARSONIST GETS 12 YEARS IN PRISON 
Capital Times [Madison,WI]
TUESDAY, November 2, 1993 
by Jeff Richgels, The Capital Times 

Page number  2A  


A schizophrenic man who set a spectacular March 9 fire that destroyed the
Select Video adult bookstore and endangered several patrons has been sentenced
to 12 years in prison. Robert J. Benio, 38, formerly of 521 W. Doty St., was
sentenced Monday by Circuit Judge Michael Torphy Jr., who accepted a sentencing
agreement reached by prosecutor Jac Heitz and defense attorney Arnold Cohen. 

Heitz and Cohen agreed that Benio suffers from schizophrenia, a finding made by
several doctors who examined Benio, but disagreed on whether he could conform
his actions to the law - the key factor in a not guilty by reason of mental
defect or disease defense. Cohen had originally intended to enter a plea that
way but changed his mind for practical reasons, he said. 

``If we had gone to trial and lost, he likely would have spent more time in
prison,'' the defense attorney said. ``But if we had won, I concluded he would
have spent more time in a mental hospital'' than in prison under the agreement.


Torphy sentenced him to 12 years for the arson and five years for recklessly
endangering safety. The second term is to run concurrently with the first.
Benio was credited with the 235 days in jail he has served since his arrest,
making him eligibile for parole in about two years and four months. Benio spent
more than three years at Mendota Mental Health Institute in connection with a
1988 fraternity blaze. He was released in mid-1992 with the misgivings of
staff, who could no longer by law keep him involuntarily committed. 

The blaze at the porn store at 665 E. Washington Ave. was started shortly after
11 a.m. March 9 when several people were inside. Investigators later said Benio
confessed to starting the fire, telling them he had warned the store operators
he would torch the building if they didn't remove bondage material. 

Cohen said Benio hears voices, and in this case he heard the voice of Jesus
Christ telling him to burn down the store because he objected to the bondage
material. 

The only drama in the otherwise placid court hearing came when Glenn Larson, a
state corrections agent, recommended that Benio receive a five-year probation
term on the reckless endangering count that he would not begin serving until
after he was released from prison. Benio, who rocked slowly back and forth in
his chair during the hearing, asked Torphy to accept the agreement his attorney
and the prosecutor made, telling the judge that before he became mentally ill
in 1980, he had never been arrested, had made good money and had a good family.


----------

TORMENT OF A DAUGHTER'S MENTAL ILLNESS 
Capital Times [Madison,WI]
MONDAY, February 21, 1994 
by Rob Zaleski 

Page number  1D  

In the field of mental illness, they have a phrase for it. They call it, ``down
the slippery slope.'' 
It means that a person diagnosed with schizophrenia has given up on life and is
beginning the long, horrifying slide toward suicide - and that, in most
instances, nothing that anyone does can stop it. 

Carol McKy sensed that her daughter, Cheryl, 26, had started down that slope
several months ago. And though she pleaded with her and sought the advice of
various health professionals, she says she realized almost immediately that it
was out of her hands. 
She had breakfast with her daughter over the Christmas period, McKy recalls,
``and she told me it was time to go to heaven, to be with God.' ``I told her,
`Well, we need you around here, to be with us.' And she said, `I'll stay as
long as I can.' '' 

It wasn't long. Sometime in the early morning hours of Saturday, Jan. 8, Cheryl
took the phone off the hook in her parents' Middleton home, closed the door to
her upstairs bedroom and gulped down the contents of three bottles filled with
non-prescription sleeping pills. 

Late that morning, her parents were getting ready to attend a University of
Wisconsin basketball game when Carol noticed that the phone was off the hook.
Suddenly her body went numb. ``I knew right away, of course,'' she says now.
``I had known all along it was going to happen sooner or later. But even that
knowledge - the realization that her daughter was suicidal - didn't help much
when the moment finally came. 

``It's a shock,'' Carol McKy says of finding the body. ``That's the only way I
can describe it.'' Cheryl McKy was, by all accounts, a vibrant young woman. She
left behind her parents, Carol, 62, owner of Advanced Medical Placements Inc.,
an employment agency, and Gale, 65, a manager for Stark Realty; three brothers,
Scott, 34, Rick, 32, and Bryan, 30; and countless friends. She was, her mother
says, not only a physical beauty, with blond hair and radiant blue eyes - ``The
boys just flocked to her'' - but a woman of considerable warmth and intellect. 

But being schizophrenic - an illness that, in Cheryl's case, had come on
suddenly - none of that mattered. In the end, though, no one could silence the
demons - the voices in Cheryl's mind - that had tormented her and convinced her
that the world was an evil place. 

Only Cheryl herself could do that - and only then by taking her life. ``What a
waste,'' says her mother. ``What a terrible, terrible waste.'' But as
distraught as she is, McKy is also filled with rage. She's angry at a legal
system that she believes is responsible in large part for her daughter's death.
And she plans to do whatever it takes to change the laws that, she and others
believe, make it virtually impossible to treat an adult with a serious mental
illness. 

After years of refusing treatment, Cheryl McKy agreed to start taking
medication - and she immediately showed dramatic improvement. She returned to
school and took a part-time job as a health care attendant. And the voices that
had been taunting her - that had convinced her that the world was dead and that
the devil controlled everyone, including her parents - all but disappeared. 

Then, inexplicably, she stopped taking the medication sometime before
Christmas. Her mother doesn't know why. And then the voices returned and, says
Carol McKy, fighting back tears, ``they told her it was time to leave.'' Just a
few weeks later, she did. 

-----------


KILLER TO MOVE OUT OF MENDOTA 
Capital Times 
Friday, March 1, 1996 
by MIKE MILLER, THE CAPITAL TIMES 

Page number  2A  

A dozen years after the demons in his mind told him to kill, James Jacobson has
made enough progress to begin another phase of his still young life. Jacobson,
30, was committed to the Mendota Mental Health Institute in 1984 after killing
his mother and wounding his father. He is now ready to be moved out of the
institution into a group home while continuing to receive therapy and job and
social training skills, mental health professionals say. 

Following a hearing in February, Dane County Circuit Judge Angela Bartell ruled
that Jacobson was suitable for conditional release and asked the Mendota Mental
Health Institute staff to prepare a final proposal for his placement and
treatment. Bartell's ruling came after reports and testimony from staff and
psychiatrist Dr. Patricia Jens indicated Jacobson has made considerable
improvement in his mental condition. 

``It is my opinion, to a reasonable degree of medical and psychiatric
certainty,'' wrote Jens, ``that the subject will not be substantial risk of
danger to either himself or others if placed in a group home'' with several
conditions, among them that he continue medications and therapy. That is in
sharp contrast to Jacobson's mental state in 1984, when doctors described him
as a paranoid schizophrenic who suffered from delusions and hallucinations. 

``In response to voices that told him to shoot his parents, he did,'' Dr. John
Greist said at a 1984 hearing. Both Greist and Dr. Leigh Roberts said Jacobson
was unable to conform his conduct to the law or to appreciate the wrongfulness
of his acts. Dane County Circuit Judge James Boll then ruled Jacobson insane
and sent him to Mendota. So bad was his mental state that the prosecution made
no effort to challenge a finding of not guilty by reason of mental disease or
defect. 

Jacobson's mental state had been deteriorating since 1983 and by February 1984,
despite his family's getting him to see a psychiatrist, he had become
delusional. On Feb. 17, 1984, he shot and killed his mother, Theresa, and
wounded his father, Donald. 

But Jacobson ``has made vast improvements since his admission to Mendota Mental
Health Institute,'' Bartell was told by Fred Siggelkow and Alan Trapp, who are
part of Jacobson's treatment team. When released, he will live in a group home
with a structured setting, a first step toward being reintegrated into the
community, according to court records. 

-------------


GIRL'S MURDERER GIVEN 75-YEAR TERM 
Wisconsin State Journal [Madison,WI]
Sunday, December 8, 1996 
Page number  8C  

MILWAUKEE (AP) - A man convicted of killing a 10-year-old girl was called an
animal and spit at before being given a life sentence with no chance of parole
for 75 years. Kevin Konrad Frank in October pleaded guilty to first-degree
intentional homicide in the death of Kristina Dziegielewski last July.
Authorities said she had been strangled and sexually assaulted. Frank, 32, has
contended that voices told him to kill the child. 

In exchange for the guilty plea in Milwaukee County Circuit Court, authorities
agreed to dismiss a charge of first-degree sexual assault of a child against
Frank. ``Your honor, what he did to her is unspeakable,'' Kristina's
grandfather, Tom Dziegielewski, told Judge Stanley Miller on Friday. ``It's
unspeakable. ``She was only 10 years old!'' 

The grandfather spit at Frank on his way back to his seat, a move that sparked
applause from the gallery. 

Miller admonished the onlookers and warned that more applause would prompt him
to clear the courtroom. But the crowd clapped one more time -- when Miller
handed down a life sentence without parole for 75 years. Earlier, Tammy
Dziegielewski, the victim's mother, called Frank an animal. Dan Dziegielewski,
the victim's father, called Frank's life sissy and pathetic -- a comment that
also brought applause. 

The violin-playing, honor-roll member and sports nut the father called Krissy
Jean ``loved life,'' he said. ``She would have been 11 next week,'' Dan
Dziegielewski said. ``That's another hard one.'' 

Defense attorney Barry Slagle, who recommended parole eligibility in 30 years,
maintained that Frank would not have murdered the girl had he not opted for
alcohol instead of expensive, anti-schizophrenia medication. Frank had nine
prior convictions. Slagle lambasted state prison officials for paroling Frank
from his last prison term without mental health treatment even though he had
been diagnosed as a schizophrenic. 

------------


'VOICES' HELP INSANITY PLEA 
WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL, SUNDAY January 26, 1992 
by Marv Balousek Wisconsin State Journal 

Page number  10A  

Dennis Wilder was convinced he was controlled by computers. Bryan Stanley
described himself as a soldier of Christ. Kurt Dehler believed he was the son
of God and James Mueller thought he was carrying out a personal mission in
President Reagan's war on drugs. Wilder, Stanley, Dehler and Mueller are among
accused Wisconsin killers who have successfully pleaded innocent by reason of
insanity during the past decade. 

As the sanity trial of Jeffrey Dahmer looms, a review of past sanity cases
shows the vast majority of successful pleas were decided by a judge rather than
a jury. Most accused killers found insane also suffered severe delusions and
some form of chronic paranoid schizophrenia. An exception to the predominance
of insanity rulings by judges was the recent Wisconsin Rapids case of Jayne
Jacobson. 

Earlier this month, a jury decided Jacobson was psychotic and out of touch with
reality when she killed co-worker Julie Schroer, 24, at the victim's rural
Wisconsin Rapids home on Sept. 20, 1990. The women worked together in the
business department of the Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune. The defense linked
the slaying to Jacobson's childhood trauma, years of emotional problems and a
love affair between Schroer and a boss. 

Another exception was the 1985 case of Aaron Douglas, who was ruled insane by a
Sauk County jury after killing his mother and two sisters at the family's
Reedsburg home on Nov. 7, 1983. 

Although Douglas was 16 at the time of the murders, the case bears some
similarities to Dahmer. A psychiatrist testified Douglas had ''massive
conflicts'' about his masculinity and sexual identity and that Douglas suffered
trance-like dazes and vivid, sadistic fantasies just prior to the killings. 

Dennis Wilder suffered severe mental illness for years before buying a handgun
at a Downtown Madison tavern and shooting his roommate to death on Aug. 26,
1985. Like most killers with successful insanity pleas, a psychiatrist said
Wilder suffered chronic paranoid schizophrenia. ''See, the computer not only
talks to you in your head, but it also controls your movement,'' he told Dane
County Judge James Boll, who found him innocent of the murder by reason of
mental disease. Bryan Stanley was found legally insane by La Crosse County
Judge Peter Pappas after he shot and killed three men, including a priest, at
St. Patrick's Catholic Church in Onalaska. After the murders, Stanley said he
was upset at the Rev. John Rossiter, one of the victims, for allowing girls to
give scripture readings. Stanley described himself as a ''soldier of Christ''
called upon to kill the three men because they were ''leading children into
sin.''  

Dehler was accused of stabbing his mother and a neighbor woman to death on Feb.
6, 1986, in Beaver Dam. He was ruled insane.
Message 2 in thread
From: Craig (talbert@ucsub.colorado.edu)
Subject: Re: Is Mind Control Rampant In Wisconsin?
Newsgroups: alt.mindcontrol
Date: 2001-03-09 01:42:04 PST

> There are two possibilities:
> 1.)Either Wisconsin has an abundance of "paranoid schizophrenics"
> 2.)Many people in Wisconsin are being targeted by mind control
> technology which is being used to force them to commit crimes against
> their will.
>After reading these newspaper articles, decide for yourself ....

How often does this occur in other states?


Craig Talbert <talbert@colorado.edu> 

"Ne te quasiveris extra."
> 
> ======
> 
> 
> MAN FOUND INSANE IN GASOLINE ATTACK 
> CAPITAL TIMES [Madison,Wisconsin]
> MONDAY March 9, 1992 
> Page number  4A  
> 
> MILWAUKEE (AP) - A man convicted of attempting to kill a college student by
> dousing her with gasoline and trying to set her on fire has been found innocent
> by reason of mental disease or defect. 
> 
> A Circuit Court jury deliberated 14 hours over the weekend before reaching the
> verdict Sunday in the sanity phase of the trial of Reginald Humphrey, 39, of
> Milwaukee. The jury decided last week that he was guilty of attempted
> first-degree intentional homicide and recklessly endangering safety.
> Authorities said he attacked the 27-year-old woman as she stood in line for a
> bus ticket at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Aug. 15. Humphrey was
> described in court records as a paranoid schizophrenic who severely abused a
> variety of drugs and heard voices for years telling him what to do. 
> 
> Defense attorney Patrick Brennan said his client would appear today before
> Judge Arlene D. Connors so that a date could be set for the judge to sign a
> mental commitment order. 
> 
> -----------
> 
> 
> MENTAL COMMITMENT ORDERED IN SLAYING:
> JUDGE RULES THAT GETTRIDGE WAS SO DELUSIONAL 
> WHEN HE KILLED A MADISON MAN THAT HE CAN'T BE HELD RESPONSIBLE
> 
> Wisconsin State Journal [Madison]
> Saturday, October 30, 1999 
> by Lesley Rogers- Courts reporter 
> 
> Page number  1B  
> 
> Renaldo Gettridge -- described as a ``chronic paranoid schizophrenic'' -- was
> so mentally delusional when he killed a Madison man last year that he can't be
> held criminally responsible, a Dane County judge ruled Friday. Gettridge, 31,
> was found not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect in the shooting
> death of Mack Dixon, 18, on Aug. 6, 1998 in a parking lot off Granada Way. 
> 
> Gettridge had been charged with first-degree intentional homicide. On Friday,
> as part of a plea agreement between prosecutor Doug McLean and defense attorney
> Dan Dunn, Gettridge entered a no-contest plea to the lesser charge of
> second-degree intentional homicide. Circuit Judge Robert DeChambeau on Friday
> committed Gettridge to a maximum of 30 years in a mental health institution,
> most likely Mendota Mental Health Institute. DeChambeau also ordered that
> Gettridge be kept medicated for continued treatment of his mental illness. 
> 
> Gettridge shot Dixon three times at close range and then two more times as
> Dixon tried to run away. Because of his mental illness, Gettridge apparently
> thought his ex-wife and former girlfriend had hired someone to kill him and
> thought his life was in danger when he saw Dixon last August, DeChambeau said. 
> 
> Legal proceedings were put on hold in October 1998 when Gettridge was found
> incompetent -- that is, unable to understand the charge against him or help
> with his defense. Gettridge was treated at Mendota and in May was found to be
> competent. When asked by DeChambeau Friday if he knew the charge against him,
> Gettridge replied that he ``shot and killed someone, Mack Dixon.'' Dixon's
> mother, Billy Jean Cox Christian, stood up in court and made an emotional plea.
> 
> 
> ``I want to ask why did he keep shooting him? Why did he steal his life and his
> dreams and hopes from him?'' Christian said through tears. ``Why did he take a
> person that didn't do no harm to him?'' 
> 
> DeChambeau said he understood the difficulty the Dixon family must have in
> accepting Gettridge's insanity plea. ``None of us here can give you good
> reason, especially, and I don't mean to speak for Mr. Gettridge ... but least
> of all can he tell you (why Dixon was killed,'' DeChambeau said. 
> 
> 
> ----------
> 
> KILLER GETS OK TO LEAVE: 
> MENDOTA DOCTORS SAY HE'S NO DANGER 
> 
> Capital Times [Madison,WI]
> Tuesday, August 31, 1999 
> by Mike Miller, The Capital Times 
> Page number  6A  
> 
> Final approval was given today for the release of Dennis Wilder from the
> Mendota Mental Health Institute, where he has been treated for the past 15
> years after killing his roommate. There was virtually no disagreement that
> Wilder, 46, should be released into the community under a tightly structured
> plan in which he will live in a supervised setting and engage in continued
> therapy. 
> 
> 
> Dane County Circuit Judge Angela Bartell approved the plan on the joint
> recommendation of Assistant District Attorney Robert Kaiser and Assistant State
> Public Defender Robert Burke. 
> Three psychiatrists who examined Wilder for the court all recommended he be
> released into the community with various safeguards in place. Among them was
> Dr. E. Rick Beebe of Mendota, who said the ``probability of dangerousness to
> himself or others on a conditional release . . . is substantially unlikely.'' 
> 
> Beebe said Wilder has made great strides in treatment since being admitted to
> Mendota after being found not guilty by reason of mental disease in 1986 for
> the killing of Raymond Denny. ``All of his overtly psychotic behavior and
> delusional beliefs abated after (1993),'' Beebe wrote to the court, ``and he
> has not had problems with psychosis since.'' 
> 
> Wilder has a history of mental illness dating to the 1970s, according to court
> records, and had been in treatment programs in his native Grant County as well
> as at both Madison General Hospital (now Meriter) and the Mendota Mental Health
> Institute. 
> 
> In late 1984 he and Denny, both of whom were receiving outpatient treatment for
> mental illness through the Program for Assertive Community Treatment, shared an
> apartment on Ann Street in Madison. On Aug. 26, 1985, Denny was sitting in a
> kitchen chair of the apartment when Wilder went to his bedroom, got a gun and
> shot him in the back six times. 
> 
> Wilder told police and doctors that he heard voices from a computer and those
> voices controlled his life and told him what to do. ``The computer was making
> me think that I should waste away Ray because of the conditions in the world,
> the Star Wars and everything,'' he said at the time. 
> 
> ``The computer has done a lot of terrible things to me, but killing Ray was the
> worst one,'' he told a doctor following the killing. He was diagnosed as a
> paranoid schizophrenic, and four psychiatrists who examined him at the time
> said his mental illness made him unable to conform his acts to the law or
> understand the wrongfulness of his actions. Four days before the killing,
> Wilder bought the gun he used at the now-defunct Salad Bar in downtown Madison.
> 
> 
> Denny was the second member of his family to be murdered in 1985. In January of
> that year, his sister, Cindy Sue Denny, was killed by her boyfriend, Scott
> Dolan, in an apartment in Stoughton. Dolan is serving a life term in prison. 
> 
> 
> ----------
> 
> 
> IN DEAL, AMARA IS RULED TO BE INSANE 
> Capital Times [Madison,WI]
> Monday, July 19, 1999 
> by Mike Miller, The Capital Times 
> Page number  1A  
> 
> Salim Amara, who committed one of the most horrific crimes in the history of
> the city when he dumped gasoline on bus passengers and set them on fire, was
> found insane today. Amara had been scheduled to go on trial today on two counts
> of attempted murder, three counts of first-degree reckless injury, one count of
> criminal damage to property and one count of robbery in the bus burning on
> April 19, 1998. 
> 
> But the prosecution team of District Attorney Diane Nicks and Assistant
> District Attorney Robert Kaiser, and the defense team of public defenders Jon
> Helland and Benjamin Gonring, reached an agreement in the case in which Amara
> entered ``no contest'' pleas to the charges against him and the prosecution
> conceded he was insane at the time of the bus fire. The robbery charge was
> dismissed on the request of prosecutors, who said there was no evidence to
> convict Amara of stealing the wallet of one of the victims. 
> 
> With three of the bus fire victims looking on, Dane County Circuit Judge
> Maryann Sumi closely questioned Amara on his understanding of his rights before
> accepting his pleas, accepting the agreement that he was insane, then finding
> Amara not guilty by reason of mental disease. Sumi immediately committed Amara
> to the Mendota Mental Health Institute but will hold an additional hearing
> later to determine the parameters of that commitment. Nicks said both during
> and after the hearing that prosecutors had little choice but to stipulate that
> Amara was insane because it was the unanimous opinion of all the doctors who
> have examined him since the fire. Helland said Amara had been suffering from
> mental illness for the past two years and the ``evidence is overwhelming'' that
> he was insane under the law. 
> 
> Amara, according to court documents, purchased gasoline at a PDQ store on
> Milwaukee Street on the far east side on the fateful day, boarded a bus near
> there and rode to the far west side of town. 
> 
> When the bus was near the intersection of Prairie and Hammersley roads, Amara
> rose from his seat and walked toward passengers Eric Nelson and his fiance,
> Heather Gallagher. Amara smiled, dumped the gasoline on Nelson, then lit a
> match and tossed it on him. 
> 
> The sudden burst of explosive flame filled the bus, injuring everybody on
> board. ``It seemed that within a split second, the whole bus was on fire -- the
> whole bus,'' victim Ernestine Wittig would later say. Nelson, Gallagher,
> Wittig, bus driver Gary Isom and passenger Rodney Scribner were all badly
> burned. Amara also was burned, but not as badly. Nelson, Gallagher and Wittig
> were in court today and watched intently as Amara was brought into the
> courtroom and seated at the defense table. It was the first time Nelson and
> Gallagher saw, in person, the man who caused them so much pain and suffering.
> Wittig had previously identified Amara as the one who set the fire. 
> 
> Had the case gone to trial, jurors would have heard how the fire quickly
> engulfed the victims and the bus and how neighbors and passersby worked
> feverishly to do what they could to help the victims until medical personnel
> arrived. The victims were taken to the burn unit at University Hospital where
> it was feared that some might not live. Nelson was the most critically injured
> with burns over 97 percent of his body and was hospitalized until June 1 of
> this year. 
> 
> The defense never challenged the facts in the case, essentially conceding early
> on that Amara set the bus fire. 
> 
> Instead, defense lawyers insisted that Amara was suffering from a mental
> disease and was becoming increasingly troubled before the fire. Right and
> wrong: Had there been a trial, the focus would have been on Amara's mental
> state at the time of the fire. Under state law, a defendant claiming insanity
> must show he suffers from a mental disease and, as a result of that disease,
> lacks substantial capacity either to appreciate the wrongfulness of his acts or
> conform his behavior to the law. Helland said there was no question the defense
> could have met that burden. ``There wasn't a jury anywhere that would say
> otherwise,'' he said after today's court hearing. 
> 
> In the months leading up to today's trial date, four mental health experts,
> including Dr. Patricia Jens and Dr. Park Dietz for the prosecution and Dr. Dan
> Begel and Dr. Caton Roberts for the defense, examined Amara. All four agreed
> that Amara suffers from paranoid schizophrenia and all but Dietz agreed that he
> could not conform his actions to the law or appreciate the wrongfulness of his
> acts. 
> 
> In Amara's case, his mental status was brought into question soon after his
> arrest when relatives said he had been becoming increasingly irrational before
> the bus burning. 
> 
> A couple of minor brushes with the law in 1997 brought Amara to the attention
> of authorities, but a competency examination in November 1997 did not reveal
> any major mental disease, doctors' reports show. Amara was hospitalized at
> University Hospital after the fire and stayed there until May 7, when his burns
> had healed enough so he could be released from the hospital and booked into the
> Dane County Jail. Within two weeks jailers were reporting that Amara was
> experiencing hallucinations, hearing voices, and engaging in screaming fits and
> profane and sometimes violent outbursts. 
> 
> At that point the county took the unusual step of having Amara committed to the
> Mendota Mental Health Institute under a civil commitment procedure. Doctors who
> examined him then also concluded he was a paranoid schizophrenic. 
> 
> AMARA'S DEMONS SCARED HIS FAMILY 
> Capital Times [Madison,WI]
> Thursday, August 20, 1998 
> by Chuck Nowlen, The Capital Times 
> 
> Page number  1A  
> 
> The terrible voices kept screaming in his brain, but he couldn't do a thing to
> stop them. They scrambled his thoughts and enraged him. He said demons were
> trying to get inside his head. 
> For brief periods, the voices would be still, and Salim Amara would become only
> the withdrawn, Walkman-wearing loner he'd almost always been.
> 
> But then, in a flash, they'd take over again, several of Amara's family members
> said in recent interviews with The Capital Times. He'd talk crazy and confront
> people. He'd rip pages out of the Bible and report seeing ``the devil's car''
> on the street. Those were the times Amara, all but homeless since age 14 after
> being kicked out by his mother, would scare the daylights out of the few close
> friends and relatives he had. 
> 
> According to family members and other sources, Amara's episodes began abruptly
> in the spring of 1996 when a supervisor found him covered with ``pots of
> sweat,'' shuddering and nearly ``catatonic'' at the restaurant where he worked.
> It would take two years and an unspeakable tragedy -- the April bus fire Amara
> ignited on Madison's far west side -- for him to get any kind of treatment at
> all. 
> 
> 
> ``He would try to explain what he was hearing, what he was thinking, but then
> he wouldn't be able to explain it,'' recalled one of several family members who
> spoke to The Capital Times on condition of anonymity. ``If you tried to talk to
> him, he wouldn't understand what you were saying. Then he'd accuse you --
> someone he's known all his life -- of trying to get inside his head, too. And
> when he'd talk, he'd have that strange smile on his face.'' 
> 
> Judgment: On Friday, the spotlight will be cast again on Amara, who has been
> held, heavily medicated, in the forensic unit at Mendota Mental Health
> Institute since May after a month at the Dane County Jail. 
> 
> Amara's mental competency hearing, which will determine whether he remains at
> Mendota for treatment or stands trial on two counts of attempted first-degree
> murder, three counts of reckless injury while armed and one count of criminal
> damage to property while armed, has been scheduled before Dane County Circuit
> Judge Richard Callaway. 
> 
> If Amara is found competent to stand trial, his preliminary hearing will
> follow. The competency hearing will turn solely on whether Amara, diagnosed by
> at least one mental health professional as a paranoid schizophrenic since the
> bus fire, is able to understand the charges against him and participate in his
> own defense. 
> 
> Amara's lawyer, public defender Jon Helland, thinks the answer is clear. ``What
> help has he been? Zero,'' says Helland, who at least weekly has gone to Mendota
> to visit Amara, whom he described as still agitated, hallucinatory and
> disoriented. ``Frankly, I don't think he knows what's going on at all. Right
> now, I'm in a position where I'm sort of shooting in the dark.'' 
> 
> In the absence of any coherent help from Amara, Helland and the mental health
> experts he plans to call at the hearing have relied almost entirely on jail
> logs, police and court records and the accounts of Amara's friends and family
> to build their case. If Amara is found competent to stand trial, Helland said
> he would mount an insanity defense. 
> 
> ----------
> 
> 
> PORN STORE ARSONIST GETS 12 YEARS IN PRISON 
> Capital Times [Madison,WI]
> TUESDAY, November 2, 1993 
> by Jeff Richgels, The Capital Times 
> 
> Page number  2A  
> 
> 
> A schizophrenic man who set a spectacular March 9 fire that destroyed the
> Select Video adult bookstore and endangered several patrons has been sentenced
> to 12 years in prison. Robert J. Benio, 38, formerly of 521 W. Doty St., was
> sentenced Monday by Circuit Judge Michael Torphy Jr., who accepted a sentencing
> agreement reached by prosecutor Jac Heitz and defense attorney Arnold Cohen. 
> 
> Heitz and Cohen agreed that Benio suffers from schizophrenia, a finding made by
> several doctors who examined Benio, but disagreed on whether he could conform
> his actions to the law - the key factor in a not guilty by reason of mental
> defect or disease defense. Cohen had originally intended to enter a plea that
> way but changed his mind for practical reasons, he said. 
> 
> ``If we had gone to trial and lost, he likely would have spent more time in
> prison,'' the defense attorney said. ``But if we had won, I concluded he would
> have spent more time in a mental hospital'' than in prison under the agreement.
> 
> 
> Torphy sentenced him to 12 years for the arson and five years for recklessly
> endangering safety. The second term is to run concurrently with the first.
> Benio was credited with the 235 days in jail he has served since his arrest,
> making him eligibile for parole in about two years and four months. Benio spent
> more than three years at Mendota Mental Health Institute in connection with a
> 1988 fraternity blaze. He was released in mid-1992 with the misgivings of
> staff, who could no longer by law keep him involuntarily committed. 
> 
> The blaze at the porn store at 665 E. Washington Ave. was started shortly after
> 11 a.m. March 9 when several people were inside. Investigators later said Benio
> confessed to starting the fire, telling them he had warned the store operators
> he would torch the building if they didn't remove bondage material. 
> 
> Cohen said Benio hears voices, and in this case he heard the voice of Jesus
> Christ telling him to burn down the store because he objected to the bondage
> material. 
> 
> The only drama in the otherwise placid court hearing came when Glenn Larson, a
> state corrections agent, recommended that Benio receive a five-year probation
> term on the reckless endangering count that he would not begin serving until
> after he was released from prison. Benio, who rocked slowly back and forth in
> his chair during the hearing, asked Torphy to accept the agreement his attorney
> and the prosecutor made, telling the judge that before he became mentally ill
> in 1980, he had never been arrested, had made good money and had a good family.
> 
> 
> ----------
> 
> TORMENT OF A DAUGHTER'S MENTAL ILLNESS 
> Capital Times [Madison,WI]
> MONDAY, February 21, 1994 
> by Rob Zaleski 
> 
> Page number  1D  
> 
> In the field of mental illness, they have a phrase for it. They call it, ``down
> the slippery slope.'' 
> It means that a person diagnosed with schizophrenia has given up on life and is
> beginning the long, horrifying slide toward suicide - and that, in most
> instances, nothing that anyone does can stop it. 
> 
> Carol McKy sensed that her daughter, Cheryl, 26, had started down that slope
> several months ago. And though she pleaded with her and sought the advice of
> various health professionals, she says she realized almost immediately that it
> was out of her hands. 
> She had breakfast with her daughter over the Christmas period, McKy recalls,
> ``and she told me it was time to go to heaven, to be with God.' ``I told her,
> `Well, we need you around here, to be with us.' And she said, `I'll stay as
> long as I can.' '' 
> 
> It wasn't long. Sometime in the early morning hours of Saturday, Jan. 8, Cheryl
> took the phone off the hook in her parents' Middleton home, closed the door to
> her upstairs bedroom and gulped down the contents of three bottles filled with
> non-prescription sleeping pills. 
> 
> Late that morning, her parents were getting ready to attend a University of
> Wisconsin basketball game when Carol noticed that the phone was off the hook.
> Suddenly her body went numb. ``I knew right away, of course,'' she says now.
> ``I had known all along it was going to happen sooner or later. But even that
> knowledge - the realization that her daughter was suicidal - didn't help much
> when the moment finally came. 
> 
> ``It's a shock,'' Carol McKy says of finding the body. ``That's the only way I
> can describe it.'' Cheryl McKy was, by all accounts, a vibrant young woman. She
> left behind her parents, Carol, 62, owner of Advanced Medical Placements Inc.,
> an employment agency, and Gale, 65, a manager for Stark Realty; three brothers,
> Scott, 34, Rick, 32, and Bryan, 30; and countless friends. She was, her mother
> says, not only a physical beauty, with blond hair and radiant blue eyes - ``The
> boys just flocked to her'' - but a woman of considerable warmth and intellect. 
> 
> But being schizophrenic - an illness that, in Cheryl's case, had come on
> suddenly - none of that mattered. In the end, though, no one could silence the
> demons - the voices in Cheryl's mind - that had tormented her and convinced her
> that the world was an evil place. 
> 
> Only Cheryl herself could do that - and only then by taking her life. ``What a
> waste,'' says her mother. ``What a terrible, terrible waste.'' But as
> distraught as she is, McKy is also filled with rage. She's angry at a legal
> system that she believes is responsible in large part for her daughter's death.
> And she plans to do whatever it takes to change the laws that, she and others
> believe, make it virtually impossible to treat an adult with a serious mental
> illness. 
> 
> After years of refusing treatment, Cheryl McKy agreed to start taking
> medication - and she immediately showed dramatic improvement. She returned to
> school and took a part-time job as a health care attendant. And the voices that
> had been taunting her - that had convinced her that the world was dead and that
> the devil controlled everyone, including her parents - all but disappeared. 
> 
> Then, inexplicably, she stopped taking the medication sometime before
> Christmas. Her mother doesn't know why. And then the voices returned and, says
> Carol McKy, fighting back tears, ``they told her it was time to leave.'' Just a
> few weeks later, she did. 
> 
> -----------
> 
> 
> KILLER TO MOVE OUT OF MENDOTA 
> Capital Times 
> Friday, March 1, 1996 
> by MIKE MILLER, THE CAPITAL TIMES 
> 
> Page number  2A  
> 
> A dozen years after the demons in his mind told him to kill, James Jacobson has
> made enough progress to begin another phase of his still young life. Jacobson,
> 30, was committed to the Mendota Mental Health Institute in 1984 after killing
> his mother and wounding his father. He is now ready to be moved out of the
> institution into a group home while continuing to receive therapy and job and
> social training skills, mental health professionals say. 
> 
> Following a hearing in February, Dane County Circuit Judge Angela Bartell ruled
> that Jacobson was suitable for conditional release and asked the Mendota Mental
> Health Institute staff to prepare a final proposal for his placement and
> treatment. Bartell's ruling came after reports and testimony from staff and
> psychiatrist Dr. Patricia Jens indicated Jacobson has made considerable
> improvement in his mental condition. 
> 
> ``It is my opinion, to a reasonable degree of medical and psychiatric
> certainty,'' wrote Jens, ``that the subject will not be substantial risk of
> danger to either himself or others if placed in a group home'' with several
> conditions, among them that he continue medications and therapy. That is in
> sharp contrast to Jacobson's mental state in 1984, when doctors described him
> as a paranoid schizophrenic who suffered from delusions and hallucinations. 
> 
> ``In response to voices that told him to shoot his parents, he did,'' Dr. John
> Greist said at a 1984 hearing. Both Greist and Dr. Leigh Roberts said Jacobson
> was unable to conform his conduct to the law or to appreciate the wrongfulness
> of his acts. Dane County Circuit Judge James Boll then ruled Jacobson insane
> and sent him to Mendota. So bad was his mental state that the prosecution made
> no effort to challenge a finding of not guilty by reason of mental disease or
> defect. 
> 
> Jacobson's mental state had been deteriorating since 1983 and by February 1984,
> despite his family's getting him to see a psychiatrist, he had become
> delusional. On Feb. 17, 1984, he shot and killed his mother, Theresa, and
> wounded his father, Donald. 
> 
> But Jacobson ``has made vast improvements since his admission to Mendota Mental
> Health Institute,'' Bartell was told by Fred Siggelkow and Alan Trapp, who are
> part of Jacobson's treatment team. When released, he will live in a group home
> with a structured setting, a first step toward being reintegrated into the
> community, according to court records. 
> 
> -------------
> 
> 
> GIRL'S MURDERER GIVEN 75-YEAR TERM 
> Wisconsin State Journal [Madison,WI]
> Sunday, December 8, 1996 
> Page number  8C  
> 
> MILWAUKEE (AP) - A man convicted of killing a 10-year-old girl was called an
> animal and spit at before being given a life sentence with no chance of parole
> for 75 years. Kevin Konrad Frank in October pleaded guilty to first-degree
> intentional homicide in the death of Kristina Dziegielewski last July.
> Authorities said she had been strangled and sexually assaulted. Frank, 32, has
> contended that voices told him to kill the child. 
> 
> In exchange for the guilty plea in Milwaukee County Circuit Court, authorities
> agreed to dismiss a charge of first-degree sexual assault of a child against
> Frank. ``Your honor, what he did to her is unspeakable,'' Kristina's
> grandfather, Tom Dziegielewski, told Judge Stanley Miller on Friday. ``It's
> unspeakable. ``She was only 10 years old!'' 
> 
> The grandfather spit at Frank on his way back to his seat, a move that sparked
> applause from the gallery. 
> 
> Miller admonished the onlookers and warned that more applause would prompt him
> to clear the courtroom. But the crowd clapped one more time -- when Miller
> handed down a life sentence without parole for 75 years. Earlier, Tammy
> Dziegielewski, the victim's mother, called Frank an animal. Dan Dziegielewski,
> the victim's father, called Frank's life sissy and pathetic -- a comment that
> also brought applause. 
> 
> The violin-playing, honor-roll member and sports nut the father called Krissy
> Jean ``loved life,'' he said. ``She would have been 11 next week,'' Dan
> Dziegielewski said. ``That's another hard one.'' 
> 
> Defense attorney Barry Slagle, who recommended parole eligibility in 30 years,
> maintained that Frank would not have murdered the girl had he not opted for
> alcohol instead of expensive, anti-schizophrenia medication. Frank had nine
> prior convictions. Slagle lambasted state prison officials for paroling Frank
> from his last prison term without mental health treatment even though he had
> been diagnosed as a schizophrenic. 
> 
> ------------
> 
> 
> 'VOICES' HELP INSANITY PLEA 
> WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL, SUNDAY January 26, 1992 
> by Marv Balousek Wisconsin State Journal 
> 
> Page number  10A  
> 
> Dennis Wilder was convinced he was controlled by computers. Bryan Stanley
> described himself as a soldier of Christ. Kurt Dehler believed he was the son
> of God and James Mueller thought he was carrying out a personal mission in
> President Reagan's war on drugs. Wilder, Stanley, Dehler and Mueller are among
> accused Wisconsin killers who have successfully pleaded innocent by reason of
> insanity during the past decade. 
> 
> As the sanity trial of Jeffrey Dahmer looms, a review of past sanity cases
> shows the vast majority of successful pleas were decided by a judge rather than
> a jury. Most accused killers found insane also suffered severe delusions and
> some form of chronic paranoid schizophrenia. An exception to the predominance
> of insanity rulings by judges was the recent Wisconsin Rapids case of Jayne
> Jacobson. 
> 
> Earlier this month, a jury decided Jacobson was psychotic and out of touch with
> reality when she killed co-worker Julie Schroer, 24, at the victim's rural
> Wisconsin Rapids home on Sept. 20, 1990. The women worked together in the
> business department of the Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune. The defense linked
> the slaying to Jacobson's childhood trauma, years of emotional problems and a
> love affair between Schroer and a boss. 
> 
> Another exception was the 1985 case of Aaron Douglas, who was ruled insane by a
> Sauk County jury after killing his mother and two sisters at the family's
> Reedsburg home on Nov. 7, 1983. 
> 
> Although Douglas was 16 at the time of the murders, the case bears some
> similarities to Dahmer. A psychiatrist testified Douglas had ''massive
> conflicts'' about his masculinity and sexual identity and that Douglas suffered
> trance-like dazes and vivid, sadistic fantasies just prior to the killings. 
> 
> Dennis Wilder suffered severe mental illness for years before buying a handgun
> at a Downtown Madison tavern and shooting his roommate to death on Aug. 26,
> 1985. Like most killers with successful insanity pleas, a psychiatrist said
> Wilder suffered chronic paranoid schizophrenia. ''See, the computer not only
> talks to you in your head, but it also controls your movement,'' he told Dane
> County Judge James Boll, who found him innocent of the murder by reason of
> mental disease. Bryan Stanley was found legally insane by La Crosse County
> Judge Peter Pappas after he shot and killed three men, including a priest, at
> St. Patrick's Catholic Church in Onalaska. After the murders, Stanley said he
> was upset at the Rev. John Rossiter, one of the victims, for allowing girls to
> give scripture readings. Stanley described himself as a ''soldier of Christ''
> called upon to kill the three men because they were ''leading children into
> sin.''  
> 
> Dehler was accused of stabbing his mother and a neighbor woman to death on Feb.
> 6, 1986, in Beaver Dam. He was ruled insane.
> 
> 

Message 3 in thread
From: Abemarf (abemarf@aol.com)
Subject: Re: Is Mind Control Rampant In Wisconsin?
Newsgroups: alt.mindcontrol
Date: 2001-03-10 13:10:06 PST

Craig Talbert wrote:

>How often does this occur in other states?

Mind control is *rampant* in some states
(e.g. Arizona,California,Washington--and apparently, Wisconsin),while in other
states, it is not nearly as widespread in it's
use. My research indicates however that in *all* 50 states,people are being
targeted.

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